It's relatively safe, and distances between sights and cities are short

It's relatively safe, and distances between sights and cities are short

Niclas Jessen / Visit Denmark

Niclas Jessen / Visit Denmark

Driving in Denmark

Discover Denmark in a car is a very good way to experience the country.

It's relatively safe, and distances between sights and cities are short. It is free to drive everywhere on Denmark’s road network, but there are two exceptions - this is the Great Belt Bridge (Storebæltsbro) between Zealand and Funen and the Øresund Bridge (Øresundsbro) between Denmark and Sweden.


Driving regulations

Of course, you will have to be aware of the driving rules before you go. In Denmark, traffic drives on the right-hand side of the road. Please notice the signs and rules of the road follow international conventions, but here are some extra things to take note of when driving in Denmark.


Take care of the many cyclists in Denmark

Denmark has more cyclists than most places, and you should pay particular attention to them when turning right. Make sure you give way to cyclists and motorcyclists continuing straight when you turn right.

Motorway driving

The general rule before changing lane on the highway is of course to indicate and if unexpected things like queues or slowing down traffic exist to use your hazard lights to warn others

Speed limits

In Denmark, the speed limits are: 

50km/h (31.1mph) in urban areas
80km/h (50mph) on roads outside urban areas.
130km/h (81mph) and 110km/h (68mph) on highways


Parking in Denmark

Parking and waiting in a car is permitted on the right side of the road but prohibited on main roads and motorways. You may not park on roads with an unbroken white line down the middle, anywhere within 5 meters (16 feet) of a pedestrian/bicycle crossing or 10 meters (33 feet) from an intersection. You may also not park within 12 meters (40 feet) of a bus stop, where the curb is painted yellow. Parking restrictions with regards to certain times and days are written on signs at parking areas and areas where you may not park. Police may remove illegally parked cars or hand out a fine on the spot. In Denmark, parking discs are required where time-limited parking is allowed.


Alcohol limit in Denmark

The blood alcohol limit is 0.5 per thousand, equivalent to approximately two measures.

Emergency

In the case of an emergency, you can always dial 112. It is a free call which will connect you to the police, fire brigade or hospital. 

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Popular Regions in Denmark

North Zealand

North Zealand

Do you visit Copenhagen, North Zealand region is the obvious choice to spend a day or two. covered by beautiful nature, good restaurants and historic castles.

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Funen

Funen

Funen is located in the middle of Denmark between Zealand and Jutland.
It is famous as home island of H.C. Andersen, but Funen has a lot more to offer especially in the summer,

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South Jutland

South Jutland

South Jutland is a historical treasure trove with 3 Unesco Heritage sites and Vikings attractions

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Nature Routes in Denmark

The Nature Route Hærvejen

The Nature Route Hærvejen

The road Hærvejen is a dream for nature lovers in the Central Jutland, and it is possible to go here by biking, hiking, roller-skate or running.

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The Marguerite Nature  Route

The Marguerite Nature Route

Discover Denmark by driving the 'Marguerite Route'. If you following this natural route, you are sure that you will discover Denmarks most beautiful nature.

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Biking in Denmark

Biking in Denmark

Denmark  is world-famous for its biking culture and Copenhagen officially was awarded as the first Bike City in the World. It was also voted the ‘Best city for cyclists’ and the ‘World’s most livable city’.

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